17 Hydroxyprogesterone : HCG + TRT Efficacy Predictor

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17 - OH Progesterone - HCG + TRT Efficacy Predictor
$82.95

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To find out if sperm count is normalized in men using hCG plus TRT, several studies have found that 17OH-P blood level is correlated to intratesticular testosterone (ITT) required for the testicles to make sperm, so testing for this hormone could not only save time while optimizing HCG dose/frequency but also eliminate the need to perform testicular aspirations, a very difficult procedure to do. Sperm count does not stabilize until 6-8 weeks after starting hCG plus TRT, so knowing your 17OH-progesterone blood level can give you a quick way to determine if your hCG dose and frequency is adequate before your first follow-up semen analysis after 8 weeks.

17 Hydroxyprogesterone and HCG + TRT: What You Need to Know

To find out if sperm count is normalized in men using hCG plus TRT, several studies have found that 17OH-P blood level is correlated to intratesticular testosterone (ITT) required for the testicles to make sperm, so testing for this hormone could not only save time while optimizing HCG dose/frequency but also eliminate the need to perform testicular aspirations, a very difficult procedure to do. Sperm count does not stabilize until 6–8 weeks after starting hCG plus TRT, so knowing your 17 hydroxyprogesterone blood level can give you a quick way to determine if your hCG dose and frequency is adequate before your first follow-up semen analysis after 8 weeks, especially if the sample is collected during the early morning in a specific time in a woman's menstrual cycle. This blood sample is usually collected in a vial or test tube, and the healthcare professional will use a small needle to poke your skin and draw a few drops of blood.

17 Hydroxyprogesterone and Male Fertility

Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) has been studied in the context of male infertility and hirsutism. While it has not been widely adopted as a clinical tool for evaluating male infertility, research suggests that men with low 17-OHP levels may experience significant improvements in sperm parameters when undergoing medical treatment for infertility [1] [2]. There is a strong link between serum 17-OHP and intratesticular testosterone (ITT) in men who are taking testosterone and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) [3]. This suggests that 17-OHP may be used as a biomarker for androgen levels, such as aldosterone and the hormone cortisol, produced by the adrenal gland. This correlation also suggests that 17-OHP could serve as a potential biomarker for ITT, particularly in the context of male infertility treatment [4]. Additionally, it is important to note the reference range for 17-OHP levels in order to accurately assess male fertility and determine the appropriate course of treatment.

Other Clinical Uses of the 17 Hydroxyprogesterone Test: CAH

Additionally, serum 17-OHP has been proposed as a surrogate biomarker of ITT and may be valuable in research and in men undergoing gonadotropin therapy for infertility [5]. Also, studies have shown that serum 17-OHP levels can also be a sign of other hormonal imbalances. For example, hirsutism, or too much body hair growth, can be a sign of a genetic disorder called congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) affecting the adrenal gland [6]. In fact, a 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) steroid hormone test can measure the signs of CAH, such as too much body hair growth and problems with the development of sex organs. This test can also tell you a lot about the health of male genitalia, like the penis, and glucose levels [7]. In the US, this test is usually ordered as part of newborn screening to find CAH because of a lack of 21-hydroxylase. The 17-OHP test may also be used to screen for CAH and diagnose the symptoms of CAH, such as excessive body hair growth and issues with sexual development.

The relationship between testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), and fertility is a complex and intricate one. TRT, while effectively boosting testosterone levels in the bloodstream, can hinder sperm production due to the suppression of essential hormones like LH and FSH. Fortunately, the 17-OH Progesterone Test offers an insightful solution.

The 17 Hydroxyprogesterone Test and Its Role in Fertility

TRT's ability to shut down upstream hormones like LH and FSH can make fathering a child challenging for many men. Adding hCG to a TRT protocol may improve sperm production since hCG acts like LH, potentially stimulating sperm production.

1. Challenge of Optimization: Finding the right hCG dose and frequency based on sperm count is not easy since it takes at least eight weeks to observe changes in sperm tests.

2. 17-OH-Progesterone as a Predictor: Several studies have shown that the 17-OH-Progesterone blood level is linked to intratesticular testosterone (ITT) necessary for sperm production. Testing this hormone can save time in optimizing hCG dose/frequency and prevent the need for testicular aspirations (Amory et al., 2008).

The Importance of 17 Hydroxyprogesterone Testing in Men on TRT plus hCG

1. Intratesticular Testosterone (ITT) and Sperm Production: Though TRT increases blood testosterone levels, it reduces ITT, crucial for sperm production.

2. Impact on Fertility: The LH and FSH shutdown from TRT decreases ITT and sperm production, leading to infertility in some men. High testosterone blood levels on TRT do not positively impact ITT; only LH or FSH can enhance it.

3. The Role of hCG: Studies have shown that hCG can normalize ITT and sperm production in some men, though the optimal dose and frequency differ (Amory et al., 2008).

How to Determine hCG Effectiveness?

  1. Performing a Sperm Count/Quality Test: Requires at least an eight-week wait period.
  2. Measuring 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OH-P): Done within 3 weeks of starting hCG, TRT decreases 17OH-P due to LH's shutdown. Using hCG plus TRT may normalize essential upstream hormones like 17OH-P for sperm production.

If the 17OH-P level was more than 6.5 nmol/L (or 215 ng/dL), one study showed that hCG doses and testosterone enanthate injections could get ITT back to normal. However, only after eight weeks of hCG initiation can the effectiveness of hCG in improving fertility be determined.

17 Hydroxyprogesterone and Female Hyperandrogenism

17-Dehydroprogesterone, also known as 17-OHP, is a crucial hormone in the human body, particularly in females. It plays a significant role in conditions such as female hyperandrogenism, which can cause symptoms such as hirsutism, acne, and menstrual irregularities. One of the key indicators of female hyperandrogenism is a deep voice, as the excess male hormones can affect the vocal cords. This hormonal imbalance can also lead to infertility in some cases, as it is primarily produced in the adrenal cortex.

In the context of female hyperandrogenism, 17-dehydroprogesterone levels are often elevated. This elevation can be attributed to various factors, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), and other endocrine disorders. These conditions disrupt the normal production and regulation of hormones in the body, leading to an overproduction of androgens like testosterone, and can result in ambiguous genitals in children and both male and female characteristics in young women due to a mutation or genetic change.

Diagnosing and managing female hyperandrogenism typically involves assessing hormone levels, including 17-dehydroprogesterone, through blood tests. Treatment options may include hormonal medications to restore balance, lifestyle modifications, and addressing any underlying medical conditions contributing to the hormonal imbalance.

Understanding the role of 17-dehydroprogesterone in female hyperandrogenism is essential for healthcare providers to effectively diagnose and treat this condition. By addressing hormonal imbalances and associated symptoms early on, individuals with female hyperandrogenism can experience improved quality of life and overall health.

Conclusion

To find out if sperm count is normalized in men using hCG plus TRT, several studies have found that 17OH-P blood level is correlated to intratesticular testosterone (ITT) required for the testicles to make sperm, so testing for this hormone could not only save time while optimizing HCG dose/frequency but also eliminate the need to perform testicular aspirations, a very difficult procedure to do. Sperm count does not stabilize until 6–8 weeks after starting hCG plus TRT, so knowing your 17OH-progesterone blood level can give you a quick way to determine if your hCG dose and frequency is adequate before your first follow-up semen analysis after 8 weeks.

Explore the 17 - OH Progesterone Test at DiscountedLabs.com, and take a proactive step towards understanding and managing fertility. Our state-of-the-art testing methods offer accurate insights, providing a clear path to optimize reproductive well-being. Contact us today to learn more!

References:

 

Amory, J. K., Page, S. T., Anawalt, B. D., Coviello, A. D., Matsumoto, A. M., & Bremner, W. J. (2008). Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone strongly correlates with intratesticular testosterone in gonadotropin-suppressed normal men receiving various dosages of human chorionic gonadotropin. Fertility and Sterility, Vol. 89, No. 2.

[1] https://www.nature.com/articles/s41443-022-00541-z

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8279241/

[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2674872/

[4] https://www.auajournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1097/JU.0000000000001016

[5] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0015028207005298

 

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